HOME|FIND MUSIC|SONIC RADIO|SONIC VIDEO|ARTIST GALLERY|REVIEWS|MERCHANDISE|SHOPPING CART|ABOUT US|CONTACT
SONIC DEMOCRACY - A MUSIC eVILLAGE - WHERE YOU CAN HEAR MUSIC AND BUY MUSIC IN HIGH DEFINITION FLAC FORMAT
like..

MERCHANDISE
icon iconeBooks
icon iconeBooks
icon iconeBooks
icon iconeBooks
icon iconeBooks
LISTEN TO THIS REVIEW
Recto Verso - Zaz
Buy Recto Verso

Release Info

Album: Recto Verso
Release Date: 05/10/2013
Label: Columbia/Sony Music, Playon 911 Records.

Artists: Zaz

Genre: French Pop

Formats: Physical and Digital

Biograpphy

Although some artists seem to have appeared out of the blue, a closer look at their career shows they have actually been through all the stages needed to win recognition from their peers and the public, one by one. Chart topping Zaz is no exception. A singer with a powerful, hypersensitive, rather husky voice, she achieved pop-pro status after years of enjoyable experiences in a huge variety of places and situations.

Truly a musical Renaissance woman, she assimilates a wide range of influences with unfailing flair, moving from jazz to blues, and French song to African, Andalusian, Brazilian and Latin genres, all with a joyful, poetic enthusiasm.

Born in Tours, France, Zaz (her real name Isabelle Geffroy), struck a chord with fans and critics when her self-titled debut record was released in Europe in the Summer of 2010 on Play On Records (the disc will be released in the US on SonyMusic Independent Network this Summer). The album went to #1 on the French and Belgian charts and was Top 10 in Switzerland and Germany (where it went to #1 on iTunes). Zaz was certified Diamond in France, Platinum in Belgium, Switzerland and Poland and is quickly approaching platinum in Germany. She also has an ever-growing hoard of devotees worldwide thanks to her videos on YouTube which have received a remarkable 23 million views.

The first single from Zaz, “Je Veux”, was eagerly devoured by an increasing fan base and was #1 on the French SNEP charts for nine weeks.

Zaz thrives on spontaneity, simplicity and good humor. She has the thirst for knowledge that characterizes the self-taught, although she actually studied at the CIAM (Musical Information and Activities Centre) in the centre of Bordeaux, where she first performed on stage. Her artistic progress led her to perfect her talents in the blues genre and she found a measure of success with Latin-Rock band Don Diego. This resulted in an appearance at the Festival Musiques Métisses d’Angoulême (Angoulême Fusion Music Festival), a cultural event held for the 35th time in 2010. Subsequently, Zaz explored new possibilities, moving to Paris where she paid her dues in cabaret, seven days a week for five hours at a stretch.

Wherever she sang, her performances were powerful and unrepressed. If she was short of funds at the end of the month, she would charm passers-by on a Montmartre street corner, singing with her musicians: a guitarist and double bass player who shared her total passion for song.

Given a platform, she expresses her uncontainable emotion with a freshness and joie de vivre that leaves no-one indifferent. Over the years, she has performed for a crowd of 10,000 at the Hendaye Stadium in Southwest France, sang Piaf’s greatest classics (a repertoire that suited her perfectly) in the heart of Siberia, gave a free concert in a Colombian salt mine, toured Egypt (sadly, she had no time to see the sights), and generally accumulated scores of experiences, each more eclectic than the last.

In 2009, Zaz was the surprise winner of the final of the 3rd Tremplin Génération France Bleu/Réservoir (France Bleu/Réservoir Generation Talent Contest) held at the Paris Olympia. She not only conquered the audience, but also made a powerful impression on singer Raphaël Haroche, who wrote three songs for her. Zaz recorded those songs on Zaz.

She has performed endlessly on television and stage, stealing the show at Popkomm last year, appearing at the Montauban Alors Chante (Then Sing) festival, the famous Japanese festival Fuji rock, the Kuala Lumpur French Art Festival in Malaysia, the La Rochelle Francofolies in May and July, the Montreal Francofolies in June and at the Jazz Musette des Puces (Flea Market Jazz and Accordion) festival with Thomas Dutronc, Marcel Azzola and Maurane.

An artist with a unique voice (which she never overstates), Zaz’s single leitmotiv is song. She will sing anywhere, as long as she can express herself freely, in words that echo daily life with its sorrows and joys.

The multi-platinum status of Zaz cemented the French sensation as one of Europe’s finest new artists. Discover Zaz’s music and join the poetic quest of a young woman whose life is built on song.

Review:

French folk/jazz singer extraordinaire, Zaz simply hits it out of the park on her second studio album. I've followed Zaz for years, and must admit that I was scared that I might have over-hyped this album to myself. It's rare that a singer can maturely evolve their sound without losing their special essence. To my utter delight, there isn't a sophomore slump in sight on this album. This album samples a broader range of music genres than Zaz's self-titled debut, yet Zaz's soulful and emotive singing is front and center at all times.

Musically wise, the first thing that struck me--was that this album was much more guitar driven as opposed to piano driven. I must admit that I miss the driving piano and think in general that you can hear much more emotion in a piano than from a guitar, but the fact of the matter is--these new more guitar focused songs are just flat out awesome. "La lessive" is subtle and controlled, yet keeps popping back into my head. I think I miss the more piano like songs, as they remind me a bit more of Edith Piaf, but this is a fresher sound for Zaz. While she can nail the sultry powerful cabaret siren, the wandering street minstrel seems to be a bit truer to who Zaz is as a person, and I think it shows in her music as well.

"Si je perds" however is a haunting piano piece that just flows from the soul. Zaz is practically speaking, her tone is so light and soft yet the sorrow in her voice just cuts through. "Si" is another standout for me in a similar manner as "Si je perds" yet is a bit more forceful and gritty. Now, while Zaz's slower songs tend to be my favorites, I don't want to give the erroneous impression that this album is full of sad slow songs. Quite the contrary, about half of them are much more upbeat and incorporate a wide range of musical instruments like the cello, accordion and even some that I can't quite identify. "Nous debout" is an immediate standout that will definitely make you want to tap your toes and probably attempt to sing along as well.

I do want to add that I don't speak or understand any French at all. Occasionally I hear a word that I may or may not recognize, but I certainly don't have any comprehension of what the songs are about unless I've previously looked the lyrics up. I write this to emphasize that Zaz simply makes music that transcends language. I would highly encourage anyone who enjoys Edith Piaf, Constance Amiot or even someone like Colbie Caillat to check out Zaz. Understanding of French not required to enjoy the beautiful and memorable experience that Zaz creates.

Arja, the lovely co-conspirator of Dutch music-nerd weblog Nummer van de Dag, wrote a piece on Zaz. This is a translation:

About a year ago I discovered Zaz, née Isabelle Geffroy. I played her versatile debut album so much, it became irritable and I had to disband her for a while. For otherwise I’d grow an aversion to French variété and gypsy-songs that would never be cured. Anyhoo, with Zaz’s new album Recto Verso in the shops and summer coming up, it sure is time for some uncut French pop.

The dog’s bollocks of Zaz’s style are her ballads. Sure, she can sing sunny songs like single On Ira or the upbeat Oublie Loulou (Charles Aznavour), but everyone has to be really quiet when the singer seems to start a slow song. ‘Cause Zaz and ballads go together like a horse and carriage. They don’t cause any dental damage because of sweetness – in my humble opinion that is. She chooses not to sing about fluffy lovey dovey stuff, but about the heartache, the despair. Her voice gets rough, the edge is showing. If you listen to a line of those ballads, you suddenly realise how comforting those songs are to you. Check out La Lessive for instance. Or Port Coton, from her debut.

The song Si Je Perds isn’t as tranquil als Port Coton, or as stripped down as Trop Sensible or Si. It’s as compelling as La Lessive, but I call it a ballad because of the melancholy way she’s singing and the sketchy arrangement. When Si Je Perds starts, you just have to listen. With full attention, so turn up the volume, close all windows and doors. Start off fresh. The guitar part makes you want to do this. Zaz’s most compelling talents, her raspy voice and narrative songs, are beautifully combined in this great ballad.
So, phew, tradition is upheld, I can carry on now. With finding out what the hell this song’s about, for instance.

- See more at: http://fillessourires.com/?p=6056#sthash.TTvqDmyQ.dpuf

Arja, the lovely co-conspirator of Dutch music-nerd weblog Nummer van de Dag, wrote a piece on Zaz. This is a translation:

About a year ago I discovered Zaz, née Isabelle Geffroy. I played her versatile debut album so much, it became irritable and I had to disband her for a while. For otherwise I’d grow an aversion to French variété and gypsy-songs that would never be cured. Anyhoo, with Zaz’s new album Recto Verso in the shops and summer coming up, it sure is time for some uncut French pop.

The dog’s bollocks of Zaz’s style are her ballads. Sure, she can sing sunny songs like single On Ira or the upbeat Oublie Loulou (Charles Aznavour), but everyone has to be really quiet when the singer seems to start a slow song. ‘Cause Zaz and ballads go together like a horse and carriage. They don’t cause any dental damage because of sweetness – in my humble opinion that is. She chooses not to sing about fluffy lovey dovey stuff, but about the heartache, the despair. Her voice gets rough, the edge is showing. If you listen to a line of those ballads, you suddenly realise how comforting those songs are to you. Check out La Lessive for instance. Or Port Coton, from her debut.

The song Si Je Perds isn’t as tranquil als Port Coton, or as stripped down as Trop Sensible or Si. It’s as compelling as La Lessive, but I call it a ballad because of the melancholy way she’s singing and the sketchy arrangement. When Si Je Perds starts, you just have to listen. With full attention, so turn up the volume, close all windows and doors. Start off fresh. The guitar part makes you want to do this. Zaz’s most compelling talents, her raspy voice and narrative songs, are beautifully combined in this great ballad.
So, phew, tradition is upheld, I can carry on now. With finding out what the hell this song’s about, for instance.

- See more at: http://fillessourires.com/?p=6056#sthash.TTvqDmyQ.dpuf

Arja, the lovely co-conspirator of Dutch music-nerd weblog Nummer van de Dag, wrote a piece on Zaz. This is a translation:

About a year ago I discovered Zaz, née Isabelle Geffroy. I played her versatile debut album so much, it became irritable and I had to disband her for a while. For otherwise I’d grow an aversion to French variété and gypsy-songs that would never be cured. Anyhoo, with Zaz’s new album Recto Verso in the shops and summer coming up, it sure is time for some uncut French pop.

The dog’s bollocks of Zaz’s style are her ballads. Sure, she can sing sunny songs like single On Ira or the upbeat Oublie Loulou (Charles Aznavour), but everyone has to be really quiet when the singer seems to start a slow song. ‘Cause Zaz and ballads go together like a horse and carriage. They don’t cause any dental damage because of sweetness – in my humble opinion that is. She chooses not to sing about fluffy lovey dovey stuff, but about the heartache, the despair. Her voice gets rough, the edge is showing. If you listen to a line of those ballads, you suddenly realise how comforting those songs are to you. Check out La Lessive for instance. Or Port Coton, from her debut.

The song Si Je Perds isn’t as tranquil als Port Coton, or as stripped down as Trop Sensible or Si. It’s as compelling as La Lessive, but I call it a ballad because of the melancholy way she’s singing and the sketchy arrangement. When Si Je Perds starts, you just have to listen. With full attention, so turn up the volume, close all windows and doors. Start off fresh. The guitar part makes you want to do this. Zaz’s most compelling talents, her raspy voice and narrative songs, are beautifully combined in this great ballad.
So, phew, tradition is upheld, I can carry on now. With finding out what the hell this song’s about, for instance.

- See more at: http://fillessourires.com/?p=6056#sthash.TTvqDmyQ.dpufFrench folk/jazz singer extraordinaire, Zaz simply hits it out of the park on her second studio album. I've followed Zaz for years, and must admit that I was scared that I might have over-hyped this album to myself. It's rare that a singer can maturely evolve their sound without losing their special essence. To my utter delight, there isn't a sophomore slump in sight on this album. This album samples a broader range of music genres than Zaz's self-titled debut, yet Zaz's soulful and emotive singing is front and center at all times.



SHARE  
 27th May
Truth, Liberty and Soul - Live in NYC (the complete 1982 NPR Jazz Alive
Jaco Pastorius
 27th May
One More Light
Linkin Park
 24th Oct
Recharged
Linkin Park
 22nd Oct
Lightning Bolt
Pearl Jam
 19th Sep
Sleep / Attack
Rare Monk
 15th Sep
Paradise Valley
John Mayer
 15th Sep
If You Wait
London Grammar
 14th Sep
Metal n Dust EP
London Grammar
 14th Sep
Action in E Minor
DJ Coming Soon
 14th Sep
Here It Is EP
DJ Coming Soon
NEXT>

SONIC DEMOCRACY | INTERNATIONAL | SITEMAP